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For buying and selling property in Metz

Metz - an unsung hero

There is something of the unsung hero about Metz. Even its name is slightly derogatory (the French pronunciation is "mess") and its reputation tarnished by old associations with wars and heavy industry. The reality, however, is that Metz is a city you can fall in love with, a city you will want to return to time and time again. And this, as fortune would have it, is easier than ever now thanks to the TGV link with Paris, operational from June 2007.

Gallo Roman roots... and ruins

Metz has plenty of history, and traces its roots back to its time as an important Gallo Roman town. There is evidence of this remaining today, and it is interesting to take time to see the Roman remains that are an integral part of Metz. Discover the remains of Roman baths, an amphitheatre and an aqueduct. And when you visit the Church of St Pierre aux Nonnais, said to be the oldest church in France, you should be aware that this was originally built as a Roman gymnasium!

Metz was under German rule

The city's history also incorporates time spent under German rule, and once more the architecture bears witness to the past. From the splendid railway station to the spectacular fortification of the Porte Des Allemands (the gate of the Germans) you are made very aware that the city has not always belonged solely to the French.

What to see in Metz

The entire city has a rather lovely golden glow to it, thanks to the use of the local yellow sandstone in the construction of many of the city's buildings. The Place d'Armes, which is surely Metz's "piece de resistance" is a superb example of this, with the stunning gothic Cathedral of St Etienne at its heart. Even if you don't usually "do" the cathedrals and churches, spend a little time on this one, and don't miss the amazing stained glass windows. If you do enjoy visiting the old churches of France, then Metz will not disappoint... there are many more to discover. Another part of Metz to keep on the "must see" list is the Place St Louis, where the old mediaeval houses rule, and where you can really soak up the atmosphere of this lovely old city.

Leisure time in Metz

Once you have had your fill of the historical areas, turn your attention to lighter matters and look to the culture of this unique city. Metz has a truly vibrant cultural life, with its famous Opera-Theatre, its renowned orchestra and its superb museums.

Shopping and dining?

Of course... and you can do so in style in Metz. There are many shops, with all kinds of goods on offer and plenty of arts and crafts to enjoy too. For the best of Metz shopping, head for the pedestrianised Place St Jacques. The gastronomy is that eclectic mix found in these north-eastern regions, where French and German culinary ideas mingle with surprisingly tasty results, and the wines are light and delicious.

Metz's green landscape

There are numerous green spaces in Metz which provide light relief and are perfect for picnics and gentle post dinner wanderings. They also disprove the idea that Metz has little to offer other than an industrial landscape! Metz is also a sporting city which hosts many successful sports teams and has facilities for participation in all kinds of popular sporting activities. You can play tennis, golf, swim, cycle, walk and more.

How to get there

You can fly to Brussels, Strasbourg or Paris. Strasbourg is served by Air France, and Paris Charles de Gaulle by Air France, bmi, bmibaby, flybe, British Airways, easyJet, Jet2, Thomsonfly and Aer Lingus. But probably the best way to get to Metz is to make use of the new TGV link (June 2007) and to travel by train. Linking Metz to Paris, the TGV is a highly efficient way to travel, and will open up the city to many who have not yet had a chance to discover its delights.

Property prices in and around Metz

The city is popular with buyers from nearby Luxembourg, and as a result the prices of properties in the city can be high. The region around Metz however, offers a chance to make a real investment in property, especially if you get in now before the TGV connection pushes prices up.

Do you know Metz better than we do? Do you have photos of Metz?

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Metz AT A GLANCE

WHERE IS Metz?

Metz is found in north-eastern France, on the Moselle River. It lies in the north-west of the Moselle department.

Metz Property Map

IN THE REGION OF LORRAINE

Lorraine Guide

Lorraine Property Map

IN THE DEPARTMENT OF MOSELLE

Moselle Guide

  Moselle Map


Population: 124,000


Access: By air: The nearest airports are Brussels or Strasbourg. It is also possible to fly to Paris. By rail: The new TGV Est route takes the super efficient TGV from Paris to Metz in the blink of an eye!


Economy: The economy is varied and thriving, with industries of metal, tobacco, machinery manufacture, clothing and foodstuffs significant. The city has a large important river port, and a heavy trade in cereals.


Interesting fact: Metz has the somewhat dubious claim to fame of having been visited... and pretty much destroyed by... Attila the Hun!


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